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You searched for: Format image/tiff Remove constraint Format: image/tiff Publisher West Virginia & Regional History Center Remove constraint Publisher: West Virginia & Regional History Center Subject Personal Moore, Arch A., Jr. (Arch Alfred), 1923-2015 Remove constraint Subject Personal: Moore, Arch A., Jr. (Arch Alfred), 1923-2015 Subject Topical United States Capitol Complex (Washington, D.C.) Remove constraint Subject Topical: United States Capitol Complex (Washington, D.C.)

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The Wheeling Girl Scouts standing on the steps of the Capitol. A portrait of Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. has been added at to the top left corner of the photograph.
A large unidentified group of men and women sitting on the steps of the Capitol. They are wearing a uniform of white shirts and black pants. A portrait of Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. has been added to the corner of the photograph.
A group of unidentified young men on the steps of the Capitol Building. The boys are wearing uniforms. A portrait of Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr., cut in a circle, has been glued to the photograph.
Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. with an unidentified family of four on the steps of the Capitol.
A unidentified group is filming Congressman Moore and three other unidentified men. A man is holding up a film clapperboard in front of the camera.
Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. (center) standing on the steps of the Capitol with a group of people from Salem College.
Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. and Congressman Harley O. Staggers standing on the steps of the Capitol with an unidentified group of veterans.
Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. standing on the steps of the Capitol with his wife, Shelley, and an unidentified woman.
Outlook for legislation that will affect the coal industry is being discussed by Congressman Arch A. Moore, Jr. (center) with Robert E. Lee Hall, vice president of the National Coal Association (right) and G. Don Sullivan associate director of Government Relations. They agreed that residual oil imports and subsidized atomic electric power are the major threats to continued increase in coal output, which that year will exceed 500 million tons. West Virginia's production, which accounts for almost one-third of the nation's total, is running at more than 7 percent above the 1964 output.